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. >>brian: joining us with more on this technology taken from above, anna kooiman. >> good morning. they are stunning, these images. they were taken while taking tsarnaev into custody. you can see in the video released by the massachusetts state police, the 19-year-old in the boat, that image you see there is his body highlighted to thermal imaging. police were able to monitor his every movement because of this technology. now watch this. those big black puffs, those are explosions believed to be the flash grenades police threw at him. the company that makes the thermal cameras said the equipment worked exactly how it was supposed to. >> i think it was a real win they could look through the cover and see him lying inside the technology has been around for decades, but as you can see it keeps getting better and better. flare has more than 100 cameras in law enforcement communities. that is all around the world, not just here in the u.s. >>gretchen: thanks for that update. so much more information coming out in the last 48 hours after the killing and then the capture of the suspects.
of technology of reengaging the public to see something and say something. better intelligence or take a better look at what local law enforcement is seeing. this was my worst nightmare. who didn't have a prior criminal record. someone that got radicalized without a footprint and dame out of nowhere. components for the bomb can be bought at a local store. >> heather: is this something we should see from now on and how do we protect ourselves without becoming a police state? >> the 9/11 cut off the head of al-qaeda. the ability to do the same type of attack is really over. this is what they have to go to now. the challenge is how do you know when someone is radicalized? the key is in talking with commissioner kelly and his team, they switch up everything. it's not about static security. you don't have people that do the same type of patrols. you mix it up. >> heather: flexibility? >> also you use different type of technology. facial recognition is not where it ought to be. cameras are after the event but we need that kind of technology pro-active. the other key is not sit back and say we have to
volume, expertise, team and of course the technology. when it comes together you have a successful surgery. >>brian: if you want successful surgery with a robot, 1-800-samadi. go to your facebook and get the ten questions. that's why you're on medical a team. straight ahead, they came to america so they could home school their children. now the united states wants to kick them out. there is a big update on this case in the next hour. plus, is that a tiger in the bathroom? yes, it is. how in the world did it get there? there? i ask you that. i think ford service is great, but i wondered what a customer thought? describe the first time you met. you brought the flex in... as soon as i met fiona and i was describing the problem we were having with our rear brakes, she immediately triaged the situation, knew exactly what was wrong with it, the car was diagnosed properly, it was fixed correctly i have confidence knowing that if i take to ford it's going to be done correctly with the right parts and the right people. get a free brake inspection and brake pads installed for just 49.95 afte
the advice next hour. regulation nation next. ♪ [ male announcer ] this is a stunning work of technology. this is the 2013 lexus es and the first-ever es hybrid. this is the pursuit of perfection. >>steve: scary logo on the high seas. we told you about how the new england fishermen are fighting foyer their livelihoods because of government regulations but they might not be the only ones affected. >> this year a lot of young guys are trying to get a start, make a name for themselves. they're hungry. >> king of the world! >> when you've got guys that are hungry -- >> heads up! >> -- that's when things get nasty. that's when the gloves are off. >>steve: that is when the gloves are off. and the hooks are out. we have the stars of discovery channel's "the deadliest catch." they join us in our studios today. how are you? >> good. >>steve: how about regulation? how bad is washington clamping down on your business? >> keith, take it over. >> that is an interesting question. they review the magnuson-stevens act every ten years. that's coming up. it's like looking at the i.r.s. of tax code. yo
that with technology you can get more out of the old fields, but this is brand new stuff. >> well, what we are doing is the wise seismics that we have been doing -- >> what? >> wise athemmic seismic, and we have done it on the shelf, and we have joined with apache on some of the fields and you look for the big discoveries under salt. you think about this, if you want to hide a big oil under it is under salt. >> how deep? >> 15,000 to 20,000 are the primary targets. >> when you talk about, you are not a huge oil company, but this is the kind of thing that i would expect a huge oil company to do, and if we have things like happened with nick moran where, or davie jones to hit some dry holes how could you be put in a damaging position by this kind of thing? >> well, the wells that we are drill i drilling are $30 million or $40 million, and we have 30%, and the one exxon is $30 million and done the first two, and the risk/reward is high and the reason they are there and while they are good sizes for us, 30 to 50 million barrel opportunities that is not going to move the needle for exxon or apache. >> we
? just wanted to check and make sure that we were on schedule. the first technology of its kind... mom and dad, i have great news. is now providing answers families need. siemens. answers. get younger looking skin fast. with new olay regenerist micro-sculpting cream. with 2 new anti-aging ingredients. visible wrinkle reduction starts day 1. see younger looking skin before you finish one jar. new from olay. >>> already under arrest, timothy mcveigh, who authorities now know to have been the man they originally referred to as john doe number one. the other principle suspect in the bombing. mcveigh moved in handcuffs and leg irons from perry, oklahoma, to a federal prison outside oklahoma city. >> timothy mcveigh under arrest on this day in 1995 for his role in the oklahoma city bombings. he was, of course, ultimately convicted, executed back in 2001. the explosion at the alfred p. murrah federal building killed 168 people and injured more than 500. it was the worst terror attack on u.s. soil until september 11, 2001. >>> up next, those who lost limbs in the boston bombing a view of what
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6